Add Azure AD Application as owner of another AD Application

This is just to explain to myself how to add Azure AD Application as owner of another AD Application because I have searched to many times for it.

You can’t do this as Global Admin. You need to be a normal user that is of course owner of the AD Application that you want to change.

This script uses both AzureAD and AzureRM PowerShell modules because on this moment not everything is available in AzureRM.

First get the owners of the application where you want to add the owner to. Check if it’s not already there.

Then get the service principal object id (property id) of the Azure AD Application

The result will be the ApplicationId, DisplayName, Id and Type. Copy the Id property (ObjectId) to add it as owner. You can also use the following shortcut:

Add the new ObjectId as owner:

Check if the new owner is set (you can check this as well in the portal):

Oneliner

Or everything in one line:

 

FluentValidation in ASP.NET Core

FluentValidation is a wonderful validation package that is around for years. Last week I was busy with a new application in ASP.NET core. I wanted to add some validation and didn’t used FluentValidation in ASP.NET Core before. So I wanted to see if things where changed. This blog post contains some examples from the official FluentValidation Getting started documentation. In the next blog posts I will go into deeper validation of properties and reusing validators in different models.

Installation

For integration with ASP.NET Core, install the FluentValidation.AspNetCore package:

Basic validation

Using the package is very easy. Let’s say you have to following class:

You would define a set of validation rules for this class by inheriting from AbstractValidator:

To specify a validation rule for a particular property, call the RuleFor method, passing a lambda expression that indicates the property that you wish to validate. For example, to ensure that the Surname property is not null, the validator class would look like this:

To run the validator, instantiate the validator object and call the Validate method, passing in the object to validate.

The following code would write any validation failures to the console:

Deeper validation

In the next blog posts I will go into deeper validation with custom validators for properties and reusing validators in different models.